Friday, September 18, 2009

Medical marijuana: so much work left to do

It is mostly discouraging to go through daily feeds of news on medical marijuana, though there are bright notes, such as what appears to be progress in Colorado because of cooperative city governments.

In California, 13 years after the passage of Prop. 215, there are still cities openly (and perhaps illegally, given the cities are legally subdivisions of the state and obligated to follow state law) seeking ways to subvert the establishment of legal sources where patients can acquire the cannabis to which they are legally entitled. I'm ashamed to say that in Orange County, the Register's circulation area, where we have published more reliable information on medical marijuana, I daresay, than in any other newspaper circulation area, city governments, far from having absorbed the information, are using incredibly dishonest and unreliable information to close medical cannabis facilities or to prevent them from opening.

Dana Point, which at least has some existing facilities, is investigating them in response to a request from a would-be entrant to change zoning laws to cement the legality of its status. Laguna Beach, which has a reputation for being liberal and is decidely one of the most gay-friendly towns in the country, has just banned dispensary facilities in response to a school principal peddling the usual stuff about "sending the wrong message" (discredited in 1999 by the Institute of Medicine report) and fearing that children would have unlimited access to marijuana -- as if they can't get it more easily than tobacco now.

Laguna Woods, formerly Leisure World, is trying to close the 15 facilities it has now. And Fresno's city paternalists are scrambling depsperately to get a law banning medical cannbis facilities validated.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why are the powers that be so afraid of Marijuana? I am genuinely curious? Is it an economic motive? The simple arrogance of those in authority who (of course) know what is best for the sheeple? Just Pavlovian support for the status quo? Do the Feds really believe their own propaganda? Do the DEA-industrial complex fear a loss of power and control? Some hidden agenda? I would really like to know....

sunflowerpipes.com said...

There are many good persuasive arguments on why America should legalize marijuana; the problem is that fact has not translated into real political pressure on the people who can change the laws. One of the problems inhibiting legalization is that people that smoke a glass pipe or a hand rolled marijuana cigarette are not considered serious or mature. It is this stigma and the illegal nature of pot that makes people hide their use from public view, therefore reality of who uses pot is different than it seems. Marijuana Legislation is a serious issue and that has profound effects on crime the economy and society. In the end it is up to us to be public about our choices and to voice our opinions to the ones that ultimately decide what is legal. Every hand written letter that makes it to a representative is considered to be the voice of a thousand people who did not take the time to write. Send an email, send a letter, make a phone call and get counted.

IMPIart.com

Medical Aesthetics Careers said...

The benefits of the medicinal and commercial use of marijuana far outweigh the downfalls. Also, the strongest arguments that are used to fight the use of marijuana are all fabricated or incorrect. We know that the taxation of marijuana or its sale will decrease the US debt dramatically, and will also help to cure cancer. THC is different forms has been proven to treat cancer patients, and if made properly, the oil can cure cancer and many other diseases that people are coming into contact with.

Madical marijuana said...

To assess the relationship between trends of Marijuana related law enforcement activities and the passage of Medical Marijuana law would require a statistical analysis over time that include measures of law enforcement activities such as arrests,as well as data on other factors that are not easily measured.